#32b How to Not Look Like a Tool in Business Communications Part Deux

Business communications are not really taught anymore. Were they ever? With social media and an air of informality, things are on the slide. Thus, the below are points I drive home to my business students each semester at the George Washington University. See the first post on this topic.

Lesson #4. Don’t default to, “Can we have a meeting/call?”

In my Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership class, mentors are assigned to students. These are busy, busy, busy women. So, I tell the students, “You want to meet with someone, get to know them. DON’T be lazy and default to the email where you say, ‘Can we have a meeting?’ This is a credibility sinker.” Why, they ask?  “Because it makes you look junior varsity,” I tell them. “You have just let them know that you either a) Have no idea what it is to be maniacally busy or b) Don’t care.”

Lesson #5.  Assume your audience has the attention span of a gnat

With complicated communications, I get creative. I will start my emails with “In this email” and bullets of what is below. I will even, by each bullet, say what is an “FYI” versus a “requires action.” Of course of course of course you MUST use the subject line of an email very strategically. I will often say their name, action required, and the topic in the subject. There CAN BE NO AMOUNT of communication spoonfeeding that is too much.

Lesson #6.  Don’t be a user

What can YOU do for the person of which you’re asking something. I like to end meetings with, “How can I support you and your major initiatives? ”  As you move up the chain and seek counsel of higher-ups, the assumption is THEY will be helping YOU. How refreshing to turn the tables and ask how you can help them? Whether it’s keeping an eye out for an intern or giving a mini Twitter lesson, you’re never to young to offer help.

Lesson #7. Honor the middleman/middlewoman

Did someone “broker” the deal and get you in touch? Well follow up with them. I tend to keep an email folder called “introductions” so I can circle back with these connectors (who make the world go round, by the way) and tell them what happened as a result of their generous effort.

Lesson #8. Start with the formal

I fly in between academic and business communities.  When I worked in the aging area, there were a lot of doctors. You need to know the rules of the industry and – within that – the preference of the person with whom you’re communicating.

You never want to be this person:

When what you need to be is this person:

How, and an example: If it’s a formal industry, or you’re not sure, just ask. Say, “How do you prefer to be addressed?” I ask this all the time of deans and  doctors. I got yelled at (via email) by a researcher in the aging area for not addressing her with “Dr.” I had been introduced to her by a fellow  member on the Alzheimer’s Association board on which I served, and defaulted to the informal (her first name). Well, this was COMPLETELY unacceptable and she let me know it. So, I always default to the formal until you know you can be informal.

Example 2: English is a dominant business language. Yet, anyone who speaks a foreign romance language knows there is a formal tense and, you always start with that. The person then tells you it’s okay to use the familiar (2nd person). We don’t have this in the U.S. Without going for the full-on Emily Post, I suggest we take some notes from more established cultures before we go too far in to the land of “c u ltr” and “ROTFL.”

PARTING THOUGHT: Is it “rude” or “getting things done”?

We capitalists love storming the castle and shaking things up.  So, before I seem too prissy with my communication advice, I should say: Don’t be so constrained by rules that you don’t get anything done. What you’re trying to do is BUILD a RELATIONSHIP.  Remember, it’s about the OTHER person and their preferences in building the RELATIONSHIP versus the arbitrary enforcing of rules.

Related Links

Your Image is You – Project a Professional Image in Writing

Back to basics? Here is a great grammar bootcamp (as you can see from the title, I believe infinitives can be split)

Find me on Twitter www.Twitter.com/ChiefHotMomma

Find me on Facebook www.Facebook.com/KathyKormanFrey

See the blog for my class at GW www.WomensLeadershipClass.wordpress.com and my upcoming private workshop for cultural exchange students www.WBL2010.wordpress.com

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What is the Hot Mommas Project?

The Hot Mommas Project is an award-winning venture housed at the George Washington University School of Business.  We make women’s stories teachable using our “case wizard” at www.HotMommasProject.org . The Hot Mommas Project library is the first of its kind, providing scalable, global access to role models and virtual mentors that can be used by educators, trainers, and parents. We’ve been featured in Prentice Hall textbooks, the Washington Post Magazine, NPR and are the winner of a national Coleman Foundation case award.

How you can get involved: Write your story, or nominate a dynamic woman 18 or older.

Our call for 2011 nominations has begun. While the contest runs through January 31, 2011 – Start now! There will be prizes this spring and fall for early bird publishers.

How it works: Nominated women come online, write their story using our “case wizard,” and click “publish” to be permanently archived in our case library.  Winners will be published in a leading Prentice Hall textbook in addition to other honors and prizes. To participate, nominate a dynamic woman 18 or older (yourself included) here or find us on Twitter. No, you do not need to be a mom.


#32a How to Not Look Like a Tool in Your Business Communications

On Brazen Careerist the other day, Ed Barrientos introduced a topic about verbal pet peeves. You know…words, etc. that drive you nuts. As a hater of the word “moist” I jumped right on this. This post takes communication preferences one step further.

People of the world:  There are many atrocious behaviors going on out there.

Lesson #1: You look like a tool if you are not thoughtful

I have foregone my office at the George Washington University School of Business and am here in my pink fuzzy slippers, listening to Metallica, tallying the winners of the 2010 Hot Mommas Project Case Study Competition.  What a sight. Here is the communications metaphor: Don’t let a casual appearance, feeling, or vibe inappropriately impact your communications or…as the title states…you will look like a tool.  (Note, this is not to be confused with the BAND “Tool” which my three year-old daughter calls “Toodle.”) This point will be made over and over again over during these posts. The social media and work-at-home revolution has created a Darwinian dividing line. My hypothesis:  Individuals who have ALWAYS had a good understanding of people EXCEL in these ambiguous or contradictory social/business communication situations. They can handle it, because they get people. This is something you can practice and grow into, but – you have to want to.

Lesson #2: Students – you can get away with murder. Normal people – not so much.

Here is an actual email I sent to a student yesterday after he – shall we say – threw me under the bus with a contact I gave him.  The rules were “introduce yourself and say you’re a fan.”  Instead, he sent my contact a “can we talk and can you look at my resume and here is the attachment” email. Aaack! This kind of stuff makes me cringe. Don’t get me wrong, this kid is great. He owned up right away and I bear no ill will. But, here is what I told him:

Email (names are disguised, of course)

From: “Student name”
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2010 5:38 PM
To: Kathy Korman Frey
Subject: Re: FW: Kathy Korman Frey Follow-up / “Famous Person” Book Title

Student Name.

When we originally spoke, hitting “Famous Person” up for internship ideas or a call was not part of it. It was about making contact and letting her know the impact of her book. Hitting someone up for advice, looking at your resume, etc – in my world view – are things that come later, once an acknowledgement of your email is established. Also, assuming someone of her stature will look at an attachment and set up a call with you makes you look naïve. (I am saying this in a nice “I-want-you-to-come-off-looking-sophisticated” way vs a super critical way).

[….Other stuff, other stuff, other stuff…..]

Prof Frey

Lesson #3. EARN your way into a relationship.

There is no finger-snapping, just-add-water relationship building. Even getting to know folks via Twitter or Facebook is a process and investment. Later in my email, I told the student,

“Don’t be the naïve undergrad who fails to recognize how RIDICULOUSLY busy a person  like ‘Famous Person’ is. You need to EARN your way into relationships.”

These are my rules of thumb for communicating with busy / famous people:

  • 30 seconds – First, you earn 30 seconds – MAYBE – via a glance at an email (less if it’s a Tweet).
  • Follow up – You earn NO additional time if they don’t respond to you. Instead, you earn an additional follow-up via phone (novel concept) where you leave a message saying you sent an email, and the bottom line of that email. And/ or, you forward the email and say in a non passive-aggressive way a la “I just wanted to be sure this came through. You made a big impact on me.”
  • Off the grid – The BEST next thing you can do is try to attend something they are attending and meet them face to face. If that is not possible, approach them on Twitter or Facebook or Linked in and remind them of who you are (that person who knows such and such who emailed you). If there is some advice you want, mention that, and how quick it will be.
  • Five to fifteen – When you approach for the advice, plan on getting from the person a five  minute email – minimum – up to  a 15 minute phone call – max.
  • Bonus Round – Anything else is a miracle and you should be thanking your lucky stars.

Wrap up: Treat a busy person’s time as they do (VALUABLE)

You’ll be an immediate stand-out in their minds versus the scads of other folks constantly asking them for things.

PARTING THOUGHTS: Has basic communication gone by the wayside? Perhaps I am old-fashioned in my advice.  However, I strongly suspect that being courteous and thoughtful will never be out of style.

Stay tuned for my next post including advice like, “Don’t be a user” and other strong opinions on communication.

Related Links

Your Image is You – Project a Professional Image in Writing

Back to basics? Here is a great grammar bootcamp (as you can see from the title, I believe infinitives can be split)

Find me on Twitter www.Twitter.com/ChiefHotMomma

Find me on Facebook www.Facebook.com/KathyKormanFrey

See the blog for my class at GW www.WomensLeadershipClass.wordpress.com

###

What is the Hot Mommas Project?

The Hot Mommas Project is an award-winning venture housed at the George Washington University School of Business.  We make women’s stories teachable using our “case wizard” at www.HotMommasProject.org . The Hot Mommas Project library is the first of its kind, providing scalable, global access to role models and virtual mentors that can be used by educators, trainers, and parents. We’ve been featured in Prentice Hall textbooks, the Washington Post Magazine, NPR and are the winner of a national Coleman Foundation case award.

How you can get involved: Write your story, or nominate a dynamic woman 18 or older.

Our call for 2011 nominations has begun. While the contest runs through January 31, 2011 – Start now! There will be prizes this spring and fall for early bird publishers.

How it works: Nominated women come online, write their story using our “case wizard,” and click “publish” to be permanently archived in our case library.  Winners will be published in a leading Prentice Hall textbook in addition to other honors and prizes. To participate, nominate a dynamic woman 18 or older (yourself included) here or find us on Twitter. No, you do not need to be a mom.

Building a Million Dollar Business Part Time #15b: Announcing Our Judges

Today we announce the Hot Mommas Project judging panel. (I’m also pasting the list below). They are awesome. Here is the press release.  How do you figure out how to “announce” something? This is how I did it given that we are going guerrilla and, even if we had more money I wouldn’t spend it because the economy stinks: Continue reading

Building a Million Dollar Business Part Time # 13: Leadership and Management

Here is another installment in the Hot Mommas Project path to becoming a million dollar venture/organization…while being led by a mom working part time. Can it be done? We’re here to figure that out. Our big thing right now is the Hot Mommas Project Case Study competition. Click here to nominate someone. As you’ll learn below, we need to get 200 women to write their cases by January 31, 2009. (We are double checking – now – that this is REALLY the number we need to achieve. Oy. I hope it’s not. More on this later.) This blog post is on management and leadership because:

1. I’ve read a lot about this area (hasn’t every business junkie?)

2. As discussed above, I’ve been going through some semi-useful OTJ training lately.

3. Heard Cameron Herold speak, former COO of 1800GotJunk, and I plan to regurgitate a lot of what he says with which I agree.

Management

The Team

Team

This is who I’m managing right now. Pictured here Achin Jain, Esther Leff, and Kaitlyn McAuliffe. We’ve recently added Ximena Iacono, primarily because her name begins with an “X” which is really cool.

***********************************

INTERLUDE

[Music starts: Marvin and Tammi rocking out to “Aint No Mountain High Enough“–because that’s what’s on Kaitlyn’s iTunes right now]

First, let’s have our interlude about self-management, perhaps the hardest management of all.

9.00 – 9.45 am – Extensive conversation with director of my son’s school. Don’t ask.

10.00 am – Back home, at computer. The team and I need to get 200 women to write cases by the end of January. [Voice inside my head] “My number one priority today is to do this blog so Kaitlyn can work her social marketing magic and drive people to www.HotMommasProject.org to write their cases.” I click on my email inbox to find notes from Cameron Herold’s talk to EO.

10.53 am – “What was I looking for?” I spent the past 53 minutes cleaning out my emails. Bad girl!

[music stops]

11.10 am – My window of opportunity is lost. I have to start prepping for a client meeting.

3.00 pm – Back from client meeting. Open email in box again to look for Cameron Herold notes.

[music starts]

4.23 pm – I’ve spent the past 83 minutes finding a new photo for www.HotMommasProject.org. Bad, bad girl!

[music stops]

5.30 pm – It’s time for a call with Esther. I have spent the past 67 minutes texting with Achin about the website, emailing with Esther and Kaitlyn about their tasks, emailing with Jennifer Moore (of Pink Heels), answering student questions via email, and posting stuff for my course on Facebook.  

[Music starts]

That’s management folks. It’s balancing, powering through, doing what needs to get done….and, if you miss one goal, you clean up real fast. I prioritized things above the blog because – well – they were more important. Including the next event. 🙂

5.45 pm – Both my kids run into my home office naked and laughing. I inform Esther our conference call is officially over. I think she says “okay.” Am hoping I didn’t hang up on her.

11.00 pm – In bed with computer. Husband is next to me in bed on computer. Blog is STILL not written. frankensteins_monster_boris_karloffWatching Skins get spanked. Trying to resist Twitter. Feel like this: “Must.Pick.Brain.Up.Off.Floor.” (Said in Frankenstein voice – Go Mary Shelley!)

END INTERLUDE

*************************************

What’s the big deal about management and leadership?

People talk about management and leadership all of the time because it’s hard. Really hard. I realize now I was a very spoiled manager. I’ve walked into situations in the past where killer teams had been picked or were part of a machine-like recruiting process. I’d manage them, and think I had something figured out. Even my past teams of Hot Mommas consultants (see first or second post on this) were pretty plug and play. They had all been senior executives and what not. On top of it, they were moms so – by definition – they could run a small country. Now it is a whole different ball game.

So, what’s really been a bad idea? The following things have been a bad idea:

1. Hiring a warm body – In the past, I have hired warm bodies. Someone says, “I want to work with the Hot Mommas Project” and I would say, “Great!” Those days are gone. (This is not true for you Liz and Meredith!)

2. Going with less structure – I work with a lot of students. Structure, structure, structure seems to work best for me and for them. (Examples below).

3. Not praising or encouraging – These people are not slaves, they are people. I see a lot of entrepreneurs treat employees badly. This is namely because they treat themselves like badly.

So, what’s been working?

The top 3 list.

First, here is the Top 5 list basic principle which I learned from Cameron Herold.

1. Always have a sense of the top 5 most important tasks you’re working on.

2. Write it down.

3. Carry it with you. Review it throughout the day.

5. Spend the last 5 minutes of each day making a list of the top 5 priorities for tomorrow.

6. Be accountable – Every day, an email should be waiting for you in your inbox from your staff with their top 5 from day before and what they hit or not and why.

THE TOP 3 LIST – our version of the above. (In a total contradiction to an earlier post, much of the team works virtually. Also, my team is part time because they are undergrad and MBA students.)

1. On your desktop have a document which says has the following: Top 3/On–Deck/Accomplished. Our Top 3 are focused on a specific goal or outcomes (measurable), and each week the actions change to meet that goal or outcome. It is immediately clear from the updates if weekly actions support a Top 3 item or not. These are our major goals right now.  Hit the following case number (number of written cases on site):

Kathy – 100 (How: Partners, personal network, HARO, Twitter, Facebook, PR, events like the American Mustache Institute Stache Bash and BlogHerDC. Earlier post =full scoop)

Esther – 40 (How: Partners with social media/women’s groups, personal network, PR, events, Twitter)

Ximena – 30 (How: Academic/faculty focus, e.g., “assign case writing to your students”)

Kaitlyn – 15 (How: Personal network, bloggers)

Achin – 15 (How: Personal network, bloggers)

If anyone out there has other ideas for us, please post here. P.s. We have no money. We spent it all on @djuth from FMS (We love you Dave! You’re worth it! ) I am so busy with the above goal have no time to raise money and am almost completely relying on GW’s development department.

2. Monday the Top 3 list is sent from the team to me.

3. I spend Monday to Wednesday coaching the team on the list and supporting them. I do this via email and/or phone. Email really takes a long time unless the list is pristine. We’ve worked a lot on that, strangely…formatting, business writing, info I need to know.

4. Wednesday is a team meeting. Since Monday through Wednesday was spent on task management, I try to focus the mid-week meeting on a discussion of results and visioning (e.g., This is where we’re heading).

5. Friday – Another update is sent. The team is cutting and pasting their list for the week, and beginning to project their top 3 for the following week. Coaching takes place via email on Friday and over weekend (when some of my team members catch up on some of their work, especially if it was mid-terms…which is was last week).

6. Rinse repeat.


7. Motivation and inspiration. Esther also mentioned that having goals, and reaching them, is inspirational/motivational/etc. So, I send out frequent updates with things that are happening. “XYZ just said they’d be a judge.” or “Look what this case-writer said!” or “This company just signed on to provide prizes.”  I put FYI in the subject line so the team can filter. We also did the a version of the “can you imagine” wall described below after last Wednesday’s meeting.

Esther’s wants to see Hot Mommas Project become a datasource of women-friendly companies.

Kaitlyn’s wants to get the Millionaire Matchmaker, who she loves, to write her case.

5 things to do to build a company and wrap up:

Kaitlyn has suggested I do shorter posts, and post more frequently…so, I’m taking her advice. Before I sign off, here are a few leadership nuggets from Cameron Herold5 things to do to build a company:

1. Painting a picture – Visualize the future of your business and communicate it to employees. Show them an example. Share it. It is not about “how.” Example: The “can you imagine wall” at 1800GotJunk where staff wrote creative ideas and dreams for the business. Here is Cameron Herold’s painted picture.

2. Great people – Like Jim Collins says, “Get the right people on the bus.” Use Top Grading by Brad and Geoff Smart plus a scorecard (letter grade for employees every 6 months). Example: Group interview process at 1800GotJunk focused on core concepts: “Do I like them and do they fit?” The goal is to raise the average skill set of the group with the hire.

P.s.

The Dream by Matthew Kelley. If you care about your staff’s dreams, they’ll go through brick walls to help you.

– At 1800GotJunk, all employees get 5 weeks vacation. Wow!

3. Reverse engineer the future – Look at every sentence of the painted picture and say, “What can we do to make this come true? What are the missing pieces?” Rank in terms of urgency and impact. Use a spreadsheet in conjunction with the painted picture to clearly see the complexity of the future. Example: 1800GotJunk asked, “How many trucks will we need in x years? What are the bottlenecks? Have we called the truck supplier?” They did. It changed their supplier relationship and way they did business. Numbers also gave them the ability to think about people they needed to hire. They were growing 3 or 4 percent a week. We did this the other day when we mapped out, numerically, how many individuals we’d need to contact to make our case goals. It was an eye opener.

4. Meeting rhythms – Plan your work. Work your plan. Example: 1800GotJunk has a very regimented process for running meetings. The basis are:

a. All meetings have a purpose and a maximum of 3 desired outcomes.

b. No agenda, no attenda – If there is not an agenda, no one will come.

c. Book for half of the time you need – You’ll get it done. This didn’t work for us Wednesday, but will keep trying.

5. Technology Accelerators – Accelerate performance through technology. Examples: Buy staff lap tops, not desktops (Employees will work additional hours for free at home). Have 2 to 3 monitors up at one time for time savings (clicking between screens wastes time). Blackberries and iPhones at blackberryguy.com (Manage the blackberry, don’t let it manage you.) Turn off notifications. Buy headsets (www.headsets.com). Have wireless in the office. The list goes on and on.

At the end of the day, Cameron believes that the secret formula is an equation: Focus, faith, and effort. Read more in his book BackPocket COO.

PARTING THOUGHT:

Since I’m giving our promotional card to everyone ranging from my Zumba instructor at Golds to strangers on the street, I feel it would be hypocritical not to give you the plug as well.

The Hot Mommas Project is an award-winning women’s leadership initiative housed at the George Washington University School of Business. We’re building the world’s largest women’s case study database which will be free, online, and available to women, girls, and educators worldwide. Read this for detail. Read promotional postcard for short attention span version. Go to our main site and WRITE YOUR CASE! Be a Role Model…Tell Your Story…Help Others…Get Published.

HEY! If you, or someone you know is a role model whose story could help women and girls, and could be taught by educators in classroom, email us and include “nomination” in the subject line. Click here to see how cool it is to be nominated.

Building a Million Dollar Business Part Time #12: Search Engine Optimization and Link Love

The Hot Mommas Project Case Study Competition has launched (what is this? See our blog brief.) Now, it’s time to get the word out. One of the ways to do that is search engine optimization and other social media tools. Lessons learned from BlogHer DC yesterday are the subject of this post.  It took a while getting there, however.

Pictured here: My shower running.

White Noise Machine

White Noise Machine

Rather pathetically, I am in my bathroom typing so I don’t wake up my husband. This is pretty indicative of the weeks/months I’ve been having which is detailed in a different post for those schadenfreude-inclined individuals.

*****************************************

INTERLUDE

[Blog Themesong “Everybody’s Got Their Something” by Nikka Costa Plays. Check out on PANDORA…my new love]

Monday October 13, 6.52 a.m.

Location: Inside my head, in my house in DC…Which is – as my son says – “In the world” and “not make-believe.”

Today, the Hot Mommas Project Case Study competition launches. I am getting ready to go to BlogHer Reach Out Tour in DC to promote the competition.

Last and this weekend were a severe flurry of emails between Dave our developer, Achin on our team (see earlier post), our testers, and me. Now, we take the BETA site live and wait for complaints, hopefully some praise. 

7.52 a.m. Now it’s time to go to the conference with Esther. We’ll see how it goes. Wish us luck.

8.48 a.m. The BlogHer conference started 18 minutes ago. I still haven’t left the house.

[Music stops]

……..Flurry of emails. Flurry of emails. Flurry of emails……..

…….Fix sign in process at http://www.HotMommasProject.org………

[Music starts again]

10.02 a.m. I am finally at the conference. I walk in directly from the garage into a really exciting environment.  Cool exhibitors and SWAG.  Tons of friendly, smart women. What’s not to like?

10.15 a.m. Attend a killer presentation on “Online community building as a natural promotional tool” moderated by Elisa Camahort Page. All panelists amazing. They ask for social media success stories from the audience.  I am called upon:

“My name is Kathy Korman Frey and I run a women’s leadership called ‘The Hot Mommas Project’ housed at the George Washington University.  We started a blog just over a year ago, and got on Twitter this summer. The increased interest we’ve received due to this foray into social media led to funding for our venture. With that money, we built a software program where women come online and tell their own story to serve as role models for women and girls around the world. We actually are launching TODAY.”

The entire room, filled with hundreds of people, claps. Yay.

12.30 p.m. – I exit presentation and look at my blackberry. We just got our first hate mail.

[Music stops]

12.38 p.m. – I get another email from a SUPER POWER interactive education guy who has agreed to be a judge for us.  (We are not revealing our judges until after the beta, but, I am psyched and so is the team!)

[Music starts again]

12.38-8.30 p.m. – I attend the rest of the conference, meet some amazing people, get fabulous reactions to the project, Esther and I hand out every last case competition postcard. We wrap up the night being interviewed by @dcconcierge for a cool women’s telecom blog and we also hear from @yoga_mama that she’s already started her case.

END INTERLUDE

***************************************

FINALLY…THE SOCIAL MEDIA AND SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION TAKEAWAYS or, as I like to call it, “A list of everything I’m doing really badly.” Is badly a word? Geeeeezzz this blogging and reading and writing thing is soooo complicated! (Said in Napoleon Dynamite voice).

(Note: I am trying to be cool and load a Napoleon Dynamite clip using www.killerclips.com, but, WordPress is like the Gestapo w/ foreign HTML so, my apologies if it’s screwed up. Use “Napoleon Dynamite” link above. Is worth it.)

TAKEAWAYS:

From Charlene Prince Birkeland at Yahoo’s Shine Magazine:

1. How to organize your site/blog. Think – Usable, clean, organized, one click away. What does this mean? No clutter. All key items “one click away” not buried.

2. Research key words. Do this at www.freekeywords.wordtracker.com. Use key words strategically in headlines and in your posts. What does “strategic” mean? For example if 1500 searches coming in for your term, you know your post will get buried/lost. The lower you go (e.g., 300, etc.), the better the chance you’ll have at winding up at the top of search results. Use the words in categories and tags. Tag photos. Rename photos (vs. “IMG5762139”) and put on Flickr so there is a better chance of it showing up in a search.

3. Know your current audience – I am not sure how to do this. I seem to have missed/zoned this part of the presentation.  From the earlier panel moderated by Elisa Camahort Page, I picked up the following:

– Poll your users (BlogHer has used Zoomerang, Micropoll, and Survey Monkey). Your blog company may offer a polling function, too, for free. One audience member suggested Google Forms as the “the stupid easy lazy way to do it.” More on Google Forms.

4. Montior

What do you monitor?
1. Page views – How many. What are most popular?
2. Time spent – How much time? You want people to get lost in your site.
3. Search terms – What terms are bringing people to your site?
4. Links (and reciprocate with link love) – Who is linking into you? Remember to reciprocate and give some “link love” meaning post on their blogs).

How do you monitor? Use a mix of the below:
Google Analytics
Sitemeter
www.haveamint.com
Stats from your pubisher’s tool (e.g. “stats” button on WordPress)
Blog ranking sites (Here are a few: http://www.blogrankings.com/, http://technorati.com/pop/blogs/, http://www.blogpatrol.com).

5. Publish

Think about publishing in new venues like:

BlogHer (not sure about dudes here)

Web circles – considered an oldie but goody (some competitors listed too)

Shine – Cannot figure out how to publish there at quick glance, but, they said you can publish there.

Boing boing – I looked this up and am not sure in what context it was mentioned, but, here is a funny Boing boing post called “Iran: You Suck at Photoshop.”

Don’t forget LINK LOVE and to post on other blogs when they post on yours…and so on…and so on.

If you get “the opportunity” with millions of hits, remember that you have a window of time. Keep the content coming, and keep it fresh, to hold onto those new readers.

6. Don’t “Spray and Pray.” This was not in the Yahoo presentation, but, is useful.  Flipping the Funnel by Seth Godin talks about social media marketing.  It is not about the MOST eyeballs, it is about the BEST eyeballs. Well, actually, it is about MOST – but the way you get there is by having ambassadors, fans, etc. willing to endorse your cause/product/idea/thoughts/words. “Find your 1000 true fans, have them make asks on your behalf…Tell a friend, put a widget on your site,” was the advice of a panelist. “People trust each other, not the media.”  This is essentially the social media hybrid version of Malcom Gladwell’s connector, maven, and salesperson concepts from The Tipping Point.

SUMMARY:

Summary of tools used commonly by bloggers/social media folk: Blogging (wordpress, typepad, yada yada), Twitter (here I am on Twitter. Here is Esther. Here is Achin. We are currently peer-pressuring Kaitlyn – stay tuned.), Facebook (here is Hot Mommas Project on Facebook), Friendster (not on this), Flickr (not on this, yet), Ning (for creating communities) some YouTube (not on this) and video stuff mentioned, but have a feeling that is in a bit of an “early adopter” stage. Some LinkedIn – not a ton. Then, do all that other stuff mentioned above (meaure, monitor, link love, etc.) and then use the below to try to keep your brain from exploding.

TO KEEP YOUR BRAIN FROM EXPLODING:

In a panel led by the authors of 50SomethingMoms and SarahandtheGoonSquad we learned about the following:

1. In Google Reader – Star article at top left corner to save for later

2. http://www.zotero.com – Good for academic research and tracking citations

3. http://www.linkedin.com/static?key=browser_toolbar_download – Linked in Toolbar for Firefox

4. http://www.yoono.com/ – Gives you access to Facebook, Twitter, etc. all at one place.

5. http://www.digsby.com/ – Another tool a blogger just spoke about (learned about it from her son. cool.).

6. http://www.rescuetime.com – Analyzes your internet usage each day. Eek! You can set timers, goals, alarms.

7. Organize yourself/make the world smaller – With tools like StumbleUpon (and other social bookmarking tools like, e.g., del.icio.us) as well as Twitter search.

8. (I added this) Use www.Alltop.com to see blogs by area of interest. Check us out at www.moms.alltop.com.

P.s.

Net squared (an initiative of TechSoup.org) helps nonprofits with all of this stuff. Always check out @Kanter with respect to this field.

P.s.s. As I mention almost EVERY FREAKING TIME – Chris Brogan (@ChrisBrogan) and Guy Kawasaki (@GuyKawasaki) are good folks to monitor re: all things social media. In this realm there is also Shashi. We can’t forget our man Shashi (Shashi Ballamkonda). He took the picture here of the three of us.

Shashi Bellamkonda

Esther Leff, Kathy Korman Frey, and Shashi Bellamkonda at BlogHer DC. Photo Credit: Shashi Bellamkonda

P.s.s. Here is Kimberly Wilson at BlogHer.

Kimberly Wilson at BlogHerDC

Kimberly Wilson at BlogHerDC

She is an ORIGINAL Hot Mommas Project Case Protagonist (the ones published before we opened up this competition).  She has a yoga/clothing/publishing empire but is super chill and unassuming. We love her. Check out www.hiptranquilchick.com for more.

PARTING THOUGHT:

Among other things, The Hot Mommas Project needs to do a better job of: Posting more freqently and doing link love.  So, those are a couple of goals.  Shorter posts would help me accomplish this. Feel like I’m writing a book here.